Writing Wednesdays

Write the Big Moment Big

By Steven Pressfield |

[In honor of The Godfather’s 50th anniversary, here’s one of my favorite Top Ten posts of the past.]

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Tom Guinzburg saves my life

By Steven Pressfield |

When I first submitted my manuscript for Gates of Fire, it was eight hundred pages long. It was as big as a Manhattan phone book. My agent, Sterling Lord, told me flat out, “Steve, I can’t sell this. You have to cut three hundred pages.”

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The Universe Responds

By Steven Pressfield |

It is not an idle or airy-fairy proposition to declare that the universe responds to the hero or heroine who takes action and commits, i.e. you and me when we plunge in, wholeheartedly, to a new creative venture.

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The Known and the Unknown

By Steven Pressfield |

When we set out to write a book or a movie—or when we embark upon any innovative venture—we’re taking a step that has terrified the human race since our days back in the cave. 

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Seb rescues Mia

By Steven Pressfield |

Continuing our series on “Put your ass where your heart wants to be” …

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A Writer’s Apprenticeship, Hollywood version

By Steven Pressfield |

I had been in Los Angeles for about five years. I had written nine screenplays on spec (each taking about six months) and sold none. I had a terrific agent who was also a great friend, Mike Werner. 

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How many words did you write today?

By Steven Pressfield |

This post is on the subject of putting your ass where your heart wants to be, i.e. the process of pursuing your creative or entrepreneurial dream by working for it.

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Resistance Thrives in Darkness

By Steven Pressfield |

Resistance kicked my butt for almost a decade in my twenties. I’ve written about this in The War of Art. I crossed the country thirteen times in that era, driving my ’65 Chevy van, for no reason whatsoever except that I was running away from myself and my obligation to do my own work and follow my own calling.

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Eugen Herrigel picks up his bow

By Steven Pressfield |

Eugen Herrigel (1884-1955) was a young German philosopher who took up the study of archery in Japan as a means of deepening his understanding of Zen Buddhism and of the concept of “no-mind.” He studied under the master Awa Kenzo and wrote about it in his classic, Zen and the Art of Archery.

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The Artist’s Work

By Steven Pressfield |

The artist’s work, like the migrant laborer’s, requires intention. It requires will. The artist must want to achieve her end.

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FREE MINI COURSE

Start with this War of Art [27-minute] mini-course. It's free. The course's five audio lessons will ground you in the principles and characteristics of the artist's inner battle.

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